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Ten Tips For Military Moms During Deployments

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August 6, 2013

Ten Tips For Military Moms During Deployments

Is your family facing {or in the midst of} a long deployment? Here is some suggestions from other military moms to help get through this time of separation and anxiety:

  1. Have a positive attitude. It will help you, your kids, and everyone who is fortunate enough to be around you!
  2. Talk to your kids about their Daddy. Preschoolers have short memories, so it is important to talk to them about Daddy and look at pictures often to make his transition back home easier and avoid “stranger anxiety.”
  3. Take care of you. Take a bubble bath, rent a movie, and talk to your children about your need for “Mommy Time.”
  4. Start a project. Make a video diary and/or a scrapbook, or start a home improvement project to surprise Dad when he gets home.
  5. Extend your family. Get involved in your community, even if you haven’t lived there very long. By reaching out to others in need, you can keep your own situation in perspective.
  6. Take the initiative. Your non-military friends may not know how to help or what to say. Take the first step to reach out and let them know how to help, whether it’s asking for help around the house or a “girls’ night out.”
  7. Leave your spouse’s “stuff” alone – even if he hasn’t used it in years, he may not appreciate it being cleaned up in his absence!
  8. Accept help! Let people take you out to lunch, come over and bring dinner, or baby-sit your kids.
  9. Limit news shows, especially if your spouse is involved in a conflict or if your child is in the room.
  10. Get out of the house – especially if you have little ones. Join a MOPS group in your area!

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